The Coalition’s Record on Health: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015

David Cameron promised in 2010 to “cut the deficit, not the NHS”. But how have the Coalition’s policies – including health reforms which are widely viewed as going beyond election commitments – impacted on health?

– While the Coalition has ‘protected’ health relative to other expenditure areas, growth in real health spending has been exceptionally low by the standards of previous governments. Average annual growth rates have lagged behind the rates that are deemed necessary to maintain and extend NHS care in response to increasing need and demand.
– Forecasts warn of an NHS ‘funding gap’ as wide as £30bn by 2020/21 unless the growing pressures on services are offset by productivity gains and funding increases during the next Parliament.
– Major health reforms emphasising decentralization, competition and outcomes have been implemented. These have transformed the policy landscape for the commissioning, management and provision of health services in England. The overall framework for political responsibility and accountability for health services in England has also changed.
– Minimum care standards, inspection and quality regulation have been revised and strengthened following the Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry.
– Key indicators point to increasing pressure on healthcare access and quality. These include indicators on patient access to GPs, accident and emergency services and cancer care. Public satisfaction with the NHS is considerably lower than a peak reached in 2010.
– The UK’s ranking on OECD “international league tables” remained disappointing for some health outcomes including female life expectancy and infant mortality.
– Suicide and mental health problems remained more prevalent following the 2007 economic crisis.
– Health inequalities remained deeply entrenched. The difference in average life expectancy between men living in the poorest and most prosperous areas of England is nine years, and six years for women.

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/case/_new/news/year.asp?yyyy=2015#772

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