The Coalition’s Record on Adult Social Care: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015

Approaching 1.3 million older people and younger disabled and mentally ill adults
use social care services in England, and 3.2 million are cared for informally, by their
families and friends. How did the Coalition respond to long-term pressures that are
putting care services and carers under growing stress?

– The Government legislated to make more people with modest wealth eligible for publicly funded
support, by raising the capital threshold used as a means test from £23,250 to £118,000 (from
2016) and introducing a lifetime cap on care costs. However, this cannot be expected to have much
impact on continued under-funding for social care as a whole.
– Public spending on social care has failed to keep pace since the mid-2000s with demand for
services from growing numbers of older people. Spending cuts imposed by the Coalition intensified
the pressure on social services from 2010 onwards.
– Overall spending is projected to have fallen by 13.4 per cent over the Government’s five years in
office. Already by 2013/14, 17.4 per cent less was being spent on services for older people. By
contrast, the number of people aged 65 and over increased by 10.1 per cent over the same
period, including an 8.6 per cent increase in the population aged 85 or over.
– The number of people receiving publicly-commissioned adult social care services fell by one quarter
between 2009/10 and 2013/14 from 1.7 million to below 1.3 million. Care at home and other
community-based services were hit especially hard, resulting in an average 8 per cent reduction in
the number of users each year.
– The number of people with learning disabilities using community-based services grew slightly, but
all other client groups experienced cuts. The number of service users among working-age adults
with mental health problems dropped by 37 per cent and the number of physically disabled users
aged 65 or over fell by 32 per cent.
– Local services were increasingly targeted on adults assessed as having the most complex needs.
The proportion of social care clients being supported for five or fewer hours a week declined from
37 per cent to 28 per cent between 2009/10 and 2013/14. The proportion receiving care for more
than ten hours a week increased from 34 per cent to 45 per cent. At the same time, nearly three quarters
of councils now arrange some social care visits as short as 15 minutes.
– Monitoring of care services based on users’ perceptions suggests some quality of life outcomes
have improved. Nevertheless, statistics on the abuse of vulnerable adults show 37,685
substantiated cases in 2013/14, while Care Quality Commission inspections revealed serious
concerns about the quality of care in a fifth of nursing homes and a tenth of residential care
homes.

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/case/_new/news/year.asp?yyyy=2015#772

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